Travis Credit Union
Travis Credit Union

Area voters express opposition to J; support split between Biden, Sanders

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Voting trends from the March 3 primary election suggest the Concord and Clayton electorate is opposed to paying more taxes to address transportation needs, as the battle for the Democratic presidential nomination narrowed to a two-man race, according to the unofficial interim voting update released on March 6 by the Contra Costa County election officials.

Measure J, put on the ballot by the Contra Costa Transportation Authority, held a slight edge countywide 138,100 to 135,919, but it was still far short of the two-thirds majority needed for passage. Voting patterns among the 68 precincts in Concord and Clayton saw the majority of voters opposing the tax to fund efforts to reduce traffic congestion.

CVCHS Ugly Strong

The presidential race for the Democratic nominee was essentially among four candidates in the once-crowded field. Self-described socialist Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden, regarded as a moderate, were gaining the most support among Concord and Clayton voters as the counting of votes continued.

Biden (58,381 votes or 30.8 percent) led Sanders (52,593 or 27.7 percent). Michael Bloomberg followed in third (30,780 or 16 percent), and Elizabeth Warren (25,653 votes or 13.5 percent) was a distant fourth.

Other contests that area voters weighed in on included the state Senate District 7 race involving Democratic incumbent Steve Glaser. He held an overwhelming lead, 92,132 (49.9 percent) to 50,214 (29.8 percent) over Republican challenger Julie Mobley.

Democrat Tim Grayson is easily carrying his District 14 state Assembly seat, leading Republican challenger Janell Proctor. Grayson has garnered 49,271 votes (66 percent) to 20,317 (27 percent) for Proctor.

It may take up to 30 days for county elections officials to verify voter records and determine if ballots have been cast by eligible voters. The frequency of updated results will vary based on the size of each county and the process officials use to tally and report votes.

County elections officials must report final results to the secretary of state by April 3. The secretary of state will certify the results by April 10.

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